peterjudson:

Studio by Peter Judson

peterjudson:

Studio by Peter Judson

(via charlieambler)

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socks-studio:

Potential Monuments of Unrealised Futures: Penthouse, by Edi Hila
http://socks-studio.com/2014/07/21/potential-monuments-of-unrealised-futures-penthouse-by-edi-hila/
Edi Hila (1944 – ) is an Albanian artist and teacher (among his students are renowned artists Adrian Paci and Anri Sala) living and working in Tirana, interested in the historical changes occurred in post communist European countries. His practice reflects on the transitory nature of…
Read more on:
http://socks-studio.com/2014/07/21/potential-monuments-of-unrealised-futures-penthouse-by-edi-hila/
post communist countries, Architecture, Art, Culture
http://socks-studio.com/2014/07/21/potential-monuments-of-unrealised-futures-penthouse-by-edi-hila/

socks-studio:

Potential Monuments of Unrealised Futures: Penthouse, by Edi Hila

http://socks-studio.com/2014/07/21/potential-monuments-of-unrealised-futures-penthouse-by-edi-hila/

Edi Hila (1944 – ) is an Albanian artist and teacher (among his students are renowned artists Adrian Paci and Anri Sala) living and working in Tirana, interested in the historical changes occurred in post communist European countries. His practice reflects on the transitory nature of…

Read more on:
http://socks-studio.com/2014/07/21/potential-monuments-of-unrealised-futures-penthouse-by-edi-hila/

post communist countries, Architecture, Art, Culture

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Yayoi Kusama, Butterfly, 1980

Yayoi KusamaButterfly, 1980

(Source: likeafieldmouse, via bogworm)

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Variations of Incomplete Open Cubes - Sol LeWitt

Variations of Incomplete Open Cubes - Sol LeWitt

(Source: abricolage, via charlieambler)

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bella-ciaoo:

Tito’s Yugoslavia was communist, but it wasn’t Soviet communism; you’ll find no statues of Lenin or Stalin here. Despite strong pressure from Moscow, Tito broke away from Stalin in 1948 and refused to ally himself with the Soviets — and therefore received good will (and $2 billion) from the United States. He ingeniously played the East and the West against each other. He’d say to both Washington and Moscow, “If you don’t pay me off, I’ll let the other guy build a base here.” Everyone paid up.
Economically, Tito’s vision was for a “third way,” in which Yugoslavia could work with both East and West without being dominated by either. Yugoslavia was the most free of the communist states. While large industry was nationalized, Tito’s system allowed for small businesses. Though Yugoslavs could not become really rich, through hard work it was possible to attain modest wealth to buy a snazzy car, a vacation home, Western imports, and other niceties. By some GDP and other economic measures, Yugoslavia was at times more prosperous than poorer capitalist European countries like Italy or Greece. This experience with a market economy benefited Yugoslavs when Eastern Europe’s communist regimes eventually fell. And even during the communist era, Yugoslavia remained a popular tourist destination for visitors from both East and West, keeping its standards more in line with Western Europe than the Soviet states. Meanwhile, Yugoslavs, uniquely among communist citizens, were allowed to travel to the West. In fact, because Yugoslavs could travel relatively hassle-free in both East and West, their “red passports” were worth even more on the black market than American ones.

bella-ciaoo:

Tito’s Yugoslavia was communist, but it wasn’t Soviet communism; you’ll find no statues of Lenin or Stalin here. Despite strong pressure from Moscow, Tito broke away from Stalin in 1948 and refused to ally himself with the Soviets — and therefore received good will (and $2 billion) from the United States. He ingeniously played the East and the West against each other. He’d say to both Washington and Moscow, “If you don’t pay me off, I’ll let the other guy build a base here.” Everyone paid up.

Economically, Tito’s vision was for a “third way,” in which Yugoslavia could work with both East and West without being dominated by either. Yugoslavia was the most free of the communist states. While large industry was nationalized, Tito’s system allowed for small businesses. Though Yugoslavs could not become really rich, through hard work it was possible to attain modest wealth to buy a snazzy car, a vacation home, Western imports, and other niceties. By some GDP and other economic measures, Yugoslavia was at times more prosperous than poorer capitalist European countries like Italy or Greece. This experience with a market economy benefited Yugoslavs when Eastern Europe’s communist regimes eventually fell. And even during the communist era, Yugoslavia remained a popular tourist destination for visitors from both East and West, keeping its standards more in line with Western Europe than the Soviet states. Meanwhile, Yugoslavs, uniquely among communist citizens, were allowed to travel to the West. In fact, because Yugoslavs could travel relatively hassle-free in both East and West, their “red passports” were worth even more on the black market than American ones.

(Source: poemtotheworld, via 1109-83)

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manifest05:

The Collège Protestant Français de Jeunes Filles in Beirut by Michel Écochard in 1961. The architect introduced many philosophies of Le Corbusier and modernism to the Middle East through this and other similar public projects. The design plays with light and shadows as well as the purity of white and simple lines. It allows for an optimistic space of learning and creativity unseen in French schools before this era.

(via architectureofdoom)

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design-is-fine:

Julio Le Parc, Modulation 62, 1976. Acrylic on canvas.

design-is-fine:

Julio Le Parc, Modulation 62, 1976. Acrylic on canvas.

(via wowgreat)

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What's the 411?

6,953 plays

(Source: idinero)

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Anonymous

you can post your icon? i think it's cool

malik-e:

ok, thanks. this is my old selfie

im ready

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